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  • Broché
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  • Waterloo: The French Perspective
  • Andrew Field
  • fr
  • 22 April 2018
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Andrew Field ↠ 5 Free read

Waterloo: The French Perspective review Ê 105 Andrew Field ↠ 5 Free read characters ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ↠ Andrew Field Ective and many of the primary French sources are underrepresented in the written record So it is high time this weakness in the literature and in our understanding of the battle was addressed and that is the purpose of Andrew Field's thought provoking new study He has tracked down over ninety firsthand French accounts most of which have nev. Having read something like 300 plus accounts of the famous battle in the 45 years I have been hooked on the subject I welcomed this account enthusiastically and was not disappointed This has to be the best account in years and approaches the subject mainly from the French perspective as the title implies with an absolute wealth of previously untouched material The author has done a fantastic job of balancing the different accounts by French eye witnesses against what we know or think we know happened at the different stages of the battle I came away after reading this book with a feeling that despite all the accounts I have previously read I know had a fuller understanding and appreciation of how this famous day went I cannot recommend this book enough and if you are a Waterloo enthusiast you just have to buy this I am now re reading it and enjoying as much second time around Let s hope for of the same from this very accomplished author Atlas historique dIsraël, 1948-1998 years I have been hooked on the subject I welcomed this account enthusiastically and was not disappointed This has to be the best account in Independence or Union: Scotland's Past and Scotland's Present you are a Waterloo enthusiast Atlas histórico de España y Portugal (Spanish Edition) you just have to buy this I am now re reading it and enjoying as much second time around Let s hope for of the same from this very accomplished author

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Waterloo: The French Perspective

Waterloo: The French Perspective review Ê 105 Andrew Field ↠ 5 Free read characters ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ↠ Andrew Field The story of the Battle of Waterloo of the ultimate defeat of Napoleon and the French the triumph of Wellington Blücher and their allied armies is most often told from the viewpoint of the victors not the vanuished Even after 200 years of intensive research and the publication of hundreds of books and articles on the battle the French persp. Ever since acuiring my obsession with Napoleonic history in childhood and for me it all started with Waterloo I ve always been drawn to the French side of the story than the English It was after all their revolution that precipitated the whole period and and their leader who gives it his name So as the years have passed and my book collection has grown it s always been something of a disappointment for me that Waterloo has until recently almost always been treated within the voluminous English language literature from the Allied or accurately British perspectiveThis galled me to such a degree that until very recently I ve deliberately sidelined the campaign that was my entr e the period and instead explored such campaigns as those of 1809 France vs Austria and 1812 France and her alliesvassals vs Russia However with the bicentenary of Waterloo I began getting back into it And in the time around and since 2015 I ve been happy to find that many books are emerging looking at the other aspects of the Waterloo campaign such as the other battles Ligny uatre Bras Wavre and the other forces such as the Prussians and our bouillabaisse of European allies German Dutch Belgian etc and even the French Andrew Field s Waterloo The French Perspective is part of this long overdue re balancing of our island understanding of this epoch ending battleThe book draws on numerous French accounts some published as standalone books but many buried in French military archives Carnet de le Sabertache etc and benefits from the excellent literary organisational principle of many short chapters which makes reading it a great pleasure as you feel you re always making good rapid progress en avance After an excellent introduction Field starts with the state of the French Army in 1815 before moving rapidly through the events that lead up to Waterloo including brief synopses of Ligny and uatre BrasThe book is also subdivided into sections The aforementioned stuff forms section one Sections two to seven cover the battle starting with the night before progressing through to the morning of the battle during which long period activity was or less constant Napoleonic warfare was a round the clock affair with all arms and ranks susceptible to the possibility of being called upon for all manner of duties at any time of day or nightEach section is full of fascinating detail and uses as much as possible firsthand French accounts to flesh out the narrative and the action There are still uite a lot of uotes from Allied and English sources sometimes to fill gaps in the French records and sometimes to either show another side to long held Anglocentric versions of events or to illustrate how the Allies reacted to certain French actions The level of detail is fantastic and the use of firsthand accounts masterful The whole thing is both highly informative and tremendously engagingThe moments worthy of mention are innumerable so I ll leave them and let you enjoy them for yourselves There s a lot here both in terms of characters and events that readers of Napoleonic literature will already know to some extent But there s also a lot by virtue of taking the French perspective that revitalises this so oft discussed battle And just as the book looks closely at the build up to the battle Field also uses his sources to look at the aftermath as the French army disintegrated and fled southSome excellent additional material analyses of tactics summaries of the various events OOB a list of French sources in addition to a conventional broader bibliography and a very enjoyable chapter of anecdotes all conspire to make an already excellent book even better Pen Sword titles can be uite varied in terms of editorial finesse I just read an abridged version of Mercer s Waterloo journal that was strewn with lamentable typos Waterloo The French Perspective is thankfully much better in this regardThis is a truly excellent and long overdue addition to the vast literature on Waterloo And it s such a wonderful thing that a British soldier and historian has like Edward Cotton so long before him seen that it doesn t tarnish British martial glory if anything instead enhancing it to look at what has for so long and so understandably been trumpeted as a key British victory from the perspective of the vanuished yet valiant foe Superbe Atlas historique dIsraël, 1948-1998 years of intensive research and the publication of hundreds of books and articles on the battle the French persp. Ever since acuiring my obsession with Napoleonic history in childhood and for me it all started with Waterloo I ve always been drawn to the French side of the story than the English It was after all their revolution that precipitated the whole period and and their leader who gives it his name So as the Independence or Union: Scotland's Past and Scotland's Present you feel Atlas histórico de España y Portugal (Spanish Edition) you re always making good rapid progress en avance After an excellent introduction Field starts with the state of the French Army in 1815 before moving rapidly through the events that lead up to Waterloo including brief synopses of Ligny and uatre BrasThe book is also subdivided into sections The aforementioned stuff forms section one Sections two to seven cover the battle starting with the night before progressing through to the morning of the battle during which long period activity was or less constant Napoleonic warfare was a round the clock affair with all arms and ranks susceptible to the possibility of being called upon for all manner of duties at any time of day or nightEach section is full of fascinating detail and uses as much as possible firsthand French accounts to flesh out the narrative and the action There are still uite a lot of uotes from Allied and English sources sometimes to fill gaps in the French records and sometimes to either show another side to long held Anglocentric versions of events or to illustrate how the Allies reacted to certain French actions The level of detail is fantastic and the use of firsthand accounts masterful The whole thing is both highly informative and tremendously engagingThe moments worthy of mention are innumerable so I ll leave them and let Les contes dAndersen (Atlas junior) you enjoy them for The Dynamics of Emerging De-Facto States: Eastern Ukraine in the Post-Soviet Space yourselves There s a lot here both in terms of characters and events that readers of Napoleonic literature will already know to some extent But there s also a lot by virtue of taking the French perspective that revitalises this so oft discussed battle And just as the book looks closely at the build up to the battle Field also uses his sources to look at the aftermath as the French army disintegrated and fled southSome excellent additional material analyses of tactics summaries of the various events OOB a list of French sources in addition to a conventional broader bibliography and a very enjoyable chapter of anecdotes all conspire to make an already excellent book even better Pen Sword titles can be uite varied in terms of editorial finesse I just read an abridged version of Mercer s Waterloo journal that was strewn with lamentable typos Waterloo The French Perspective is thankfully much better in this regardThis is a truly excellent and long overdue addition to the vast literature on Waterloo And it s such a wonderful thing that a British soldier and historian has like Edward Cotton so long before him seen that it doesn t tarnish British martial glory if anything instead enhancing it to look at what has for so long and so understandably been trumpeted as a key British victory from the perspective of the vanuished

characters ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ↠ Andrew Field

Waterloo: The French Perspective review Ê 105 Andrew Field ↠ 5 Free read characters ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ↠ Andrew Field Er been previously published in English and he has combined them with accounts from the other participants in order to create a graphic new narrative of one of the world's decisive battles Virtually all of the hitherto unpublished testimony provides fascinating new detail on the battle and many of the accounts are vivid revealing and excitin. It s surprising that nobody has previously acted on Andrew Field s idea of describing the battle from the French side but as far as I can tell nobody has and thus his work is a much needed addition to the canonMr Field is a fluent and articulate writer and a former soldier himself and he makes use of both of these advantages to explain conclusively in my view several aspects of the battle that have long been mysterious One such is the uestion of which cavalry went forward with d Erlon s initial assault Previous accounts have said this was a regiment a brigade or even a whole division of cuirassiers but by the simple expedient of consulting what the French participants said and wrote Andrew Field arrives persuasively at a different answer that rings true Likewise his soldier s mind comes up with the most convincing account yet for why d Erlon chose the much criticised formation he used in his advance essentially d Erlon and his divisional commanders were all Peninsular veterans and this informed their expectationsAnother aspect of Waterloo that I have never seen fully explained is the course of the cavalry versus suares action along the ridge In most accounts the French charged endlessly until exhausted and then uit the allies sat around ineffectually in suare getting pasted by huge and mysterious clouds of skirmishers until suddenly they won Mr Field s account of the cavalry action is altogether thoughtful and nuanced than this He delves into what was actually happening along the ridge and shows that Wellington s line was constructively overrun for much of the afternoon but the small steady running fire of the suares took a cumulative toll Several British suares appear to have been forced back and briefly broken a controversial claim but one he backs up with eyewitness accounts from both sidesMuch of the underlying reason for this abrupt reversal can be found in Mr Field s analysis of the morale state of the French army going into the campaign his conclusion again based on convincing evidence being that the atmosphere of distrust and betrayal meant there was something profoundly wrong with this French army He returns to this point occasionally so that its stunning and rapid collapse make much sense here than in other accountsI have only a couple of uibbles One is with some of the translations he refers to French former prisoners having been released from pontoons but the word is surely the prison hulks in which PoWs were confined Another reservation slightly significant is with the units Mr Field refers to as the Middle Guard Only between 1810 and 1812 was it the case that the 1st Grenadiers and the 1st Chasseurs were classified alone as Old Guard while the second regiments of each as Middle Guard After the 1812 disaster the Old Guard comprised all four Grenadier and Chasseur regiments while the Middle Guard in 1813 1814 were two distinct and specific units called the Fusilier Grenadiers and the Fusilier Chasseurs Those Middle Guard regiments were not reactivated in 1815 and hence there was no formation that could properly be called that There were instead a third and fourth regiment each of grenadiers and chasseurs whom Davout s Ministry of War called Old Guard There is a legitimate uestion as to the relative uality of the Guard in 1815 but that is not the same uestion and when this confusion arises today it is usually because the writer has been relying on unreliable revisionist sources This leads me onto my final uibble which is Mr Field s acknowledgement of David Hamilton Williams and Peter Hofschroer as sources These are both of about eual very scant value the former having been exposed as a fraud who made up a whole archive to support his fabrications while the latter has been sectioned under the Mental Health Act has been barred from litigation as vexatious has lost libel actions against other historians and is currently in prison for paedophiliaThese points aside however this was an excellent read Something that really stands out in this account and of which we have long needed to be reminded is how central it was to Napoleon s thinking to defeat specifically Wellington He invaded Belgium aiming to destroy Wellington first and defeated the Prussians first at Ligny instead simply because they were foolish enough to offer battle there in a poorly chosen position But despite the revisionism of the last few years at no point did Napoleon or his marshals consider the defeat of the Prussian or the Dutch armies to be the key to the campaign At no point did the French focus all out on breaking the Nassau or the Belgian units of Wellington s army The eyewitness French accounts make literally almost no mention of their successes against the Hanoverians They are all about how close they came to beating the English because when it came down to tacks in 1815 that was who had to be defeated The man they had to beat but could not was Wellington whose army faced a stronger concentration of French troops at Waterloo than had the Prussians larger army at Ligny and which at Waterloo held off and then routed all but 10000 of those French including all its heavy cavalry and most of its elite infantry It was this army and this general whose defeat Napoleon was sure would result in defections from the Allied cause and the occupation of Brussels and in Mr Field s account we have it from the horse s mouthRefreshing and recommended